Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Should You Feed 1:1 or 2:1 In The Fall?








HIVE TALK is a beekeeping podcast with Jon Zawislak and David Burns. Join them today at 1:30 central time. They will be talking about why colonies become more defensive in the fall and steps to take to reduce stings during fall inspections.  

Join two EAS certified master beekeepers and listen to them gab about stuff but mostly about bees. We need some of you to please call in and asks questions. You can make Hive Talk more interesting by calling in and asking questions live, or by logging in on your computer and texting us your question. Here's how: The number to call is: 1-605-562-0444

When you call in you'll be asked to enter our SHOW ID which is: 129777 followed by the # sign. Then the automated system will ask you for your Pin number which is 1 followed by the # sign. At that point, you'll be on the show with us so you can ask your questions. So you don't have to worry about keeping your kids or dogs quiet. You will be muted unless you press * 8 on your phone and that will allow us to unmute you so you can ask your question. Call in around 10 minutes prior to broadcast, at 1:30 p.m. central time.  If you want to just listen from your computer, go to: http://www.talkshoe.com/tc/129777
Set your alarm and your smart phones. 

If you missed us live, listen to the recorded episode on iTunes by clicking here.

FREE WINTER BEE KIND 
FOR NEW BEETEAM6 MEMBER SIGN UPS
Beekeeping Mentorship/Coaching Program
SEPTEMBER SIGN UP - Free Winter-Bee-Kind
David offers a mentoring/coaching program to beekeepers around the country. You can call, email or text your questions to David, an EAS Certified Master Beekeeper. Plus, you receive a regular tip and video from David. Those who sign up in the month of September will receive one free Winter-Bee-Kind on your four month anniversary, in December. YOUR CHRISTMAS PRESENT! Free Shipping too! Click here to sign up now. 

2:1 or 1:1 Which Is Best For Fall
The fall presents many challenges one of which is to know what to feed bees. Should it be? 1:1 or 2:1 sugar water. Traditionally, 2:1 (2 parts sugar and 1 part water) sugar water is given in the fall. However, this does not afford the colony the opportunity to build up brood. 2:1 is thicker enabling the bees to dry it faster in the fall for stored honey. 1:1 is much more beneficial because it enables the colony to continue to raise brood. Brood raised in the fall will be bees of winter physiology, meaning that they will live 4-6 months rather than 45 days in the summer. I, therefore, encourage you to do both 2:1 and 1:1.

Our Burns Bees Feeding System  allows the beekeeper to feed both 1:1 and 2:1 and a pollen patty in the fall. This gives the bees added incentive to store honey, raise brood and to have the protein to do it all. Our Winter-Bee-Kinds provide winter food. 

TIP OF THE DAY: When to feed liquid sugar and when to feed a candy board: A colony will cluster when temperatures reach 50 degrees (f) or below. At this temperature bees will no longer consume liquid sugar water. My rule of thumb is that when bees are no longer flying due to colder temperatures it is best to place our winter-bee-kinds on top of your brood nest area. This allows the winter cluster to continue to have the added food as insurance. You've worked so hard to keep your colony healthy all year. So don't let them starve this winter.


Beekeeping Class
Getting Your Bees Through The Winter
Take our ONLINE COURSE "Getting Your Bees Through The Winter" and learn how to properly prepare your bees for winter. You are likely missing out on simple steps needed to keep your bees healthy all winter. Get one month of free mentorship by David.


Check out my two most recent videos on identifying brood patterns and how to know when your honey is capped over enough for harvest:




I'm glad you are keeping bees or thinking about it. Thank you for supporting our family business for all your beekeeping needs.

Sincerely,

David and Sheri Burns
Long Lane Honey Bee Farms
217-427-2678

New 2018 Store Location Hours:
Monday- Closed
Tuesday 10am - 2pm
Wednesday 10am - 2pm
Thursday 10am - 2pm
Friday 10am - 2pm
Saturday - 10am -2pm

Come visit us soon!

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Preparing A Weak Hive For Winter

Hive Talk Beekeeping Podcast at 1:30 Today Central Time

HIVE TALK is a beekeeping podcast with Jon Zawislak and David Burns. Join them today at 1:30 central time. They will be talking about the science, art and love of beekeeping.  Join two EAS certified master beekeepers and listen to them gab about stuff but mostly about bees. You can make Hive Talk more interesting by calling in and asking questions live, or by logging in on your computer and texting us your question. Here's how: The number to call is: 1-724-444-7444.

When you call in you'll be asked to enter our SHOW ID which is: 129777 followed by the # sign. Then the automated system will ask you for your Pin number which is 1 followed by the # sign. At that point, you'll be on the show with us so you can ask your questions. So you don't have to worry about keeping your kids or dogs quiet. You will be muted unless you press * 8 on your phone and that will allow us to unmute you so you can ask your question. Call in around 10 minutes prior to broadcast, at 1:30 p.m. central time.  If you want to just listen from your computer, go to: http://www.talkshoe.com/tc/129777
Set your alarm and your smart phones. 

If you missed us live, listen to the recorded episode on iTunes by clicking here.

Beekeeping Mentorship/Coaching Program
SEPTEMBER SIGN UP - Free Winter-Bee-Kind
David offers a mentoring/coaching program to beekeepers. You can call, email or text your questions to David, an EAS certified mClick here to sign up now. 
aster beekeeper. Plus, you receive a regular tip and video from David. Those who sign up in the month of September will receive one free Winter-Bee-Kind on your four month anniversary, in December. Free Shipping too!


HOW TO PREPARE A WEAK COLONY FOR WINTER
Today I'll answer the following questions: What is considered a weak colony? What causes a hive to become weak? What action should be taken to strengthen a weak colony going into winter?

WHAT IS CONSIDERED A WEAK HIVE
While some hives are easy to identify as weak, other hives might be only marginally weak. Often it is easier to identify a weak hive when the beekeeper has other hives to compare it to. So let’s consider what we would look for determining the colony is weak.
1) Adult bee population
2) Amount of sealed and open brood
3) Amount of pollen, nectar and capped honey
4) Queen’s laying pattern
5) Diseases and pests

Colonies in the south require fewer bees and food resources to survive the shorter winter season. However, in the north colonies require more bees for warmth and insulation and more stored food resources (honey and pollen) to feed on during the longer winter seasons. Depending on where you live, you will need to adjust your evaluation somewhat.

First, what should the population be? We want to see lots of bees in an established hive, preferably, bees covering both sides of every frame. Of course, there will be fewer bees in the hive during foraging hours, so examine the hive prior to or after foraging hours (10am-5pm).

Many beekeepers make the mistake of seeing lots of bees this time of year and fail to realize that all adult bees in September will be dead in 45 days. This means all the adult bees you see will be dead by the middle of October. This means we need to be equally concerned about the amount of brood.

good broodSecondly, there should be an ample amount of sealed and open brood. Here is an image of capped brood. New beekeepers may confuse sealed brood with a frame of sealed honey. Here’s some difference: Sealed brood is sealed with a dryer looking wax capping, almost like velvet or fabric in appearance. Honey is sealed with wax that looks wet or lacking texture. If you are still in doubt use a toothpick to examine what is below the capping. You’ll know immediately whether it is filled with honey or a pupating honey bee.

A strong colony consisting of two deep hive bodies will have a total of 10 or more frames of sealed and open brood in the hive, usually at least 5 frames in each deep box. These brood frames will be located near the center of the hive box. If a hive only has one or two frames of brood in each hive body it is a weak colony and something is wrong.

Because the queen reduces laying during extreme heat and when the days begin to shorten in fall, it is essential that you continue feeding your bees during the fall. This extra food will allow the queen to continue laying eggs and provide the brood you need in November and December. When these bees emerge, they will be bees of winter physiology and will live 4-6 months. There, you must feed you bees 1:1 sugar water with a teaspoon of pollen powder so the nurse bees can feed the young larvae. You need approximately 40,000 bees in a colony to provide the clustered heat to survive the winter.

We recommend using a top feed, never an entrance feeder. Our top feeder allows the beekeeper to feed from the top without being bothered by bees while feeding them both sugar water and pollen powder.


Thirdly, a strong colony will have sufficient nectar, honey and pollen stored in combs. Since a strong colony will have 10 frames of brood, and some of these frames contain open brood, lots of resources are needed to care for young developing brood. A weak colony may only have 1 or 2 frames of pollen. A strong colony will have 4 or more and the same is true with nectar. But keep in mind that these resources will usually be shared on the same frames with brood. Often bees will make a rainbow appearance on a frame, with the brood being in the center, pollen next and nectar/honey on the outside edges of the frame. This all must be taken into consideration when assessing the content of a hive.

I overwinter with one full honey super above two deep boxes. Plus, I place my Winter-Bee-Kind feeding system on for winter. Specify an 8 frame or 10 frame hive when placing your orders. This is added insurance that my bees will not run out of resources.

Viability TestFourthly, evaluate your queen’s laying pattern. A well mated queen should have a beautiful laying pattern. To evaluate our queens we use a brood vitality test. Pull out a frame of sealed brood and identify a section 10 cells by 10 cells. Now count the number of open cells within this 10 x 10 cell square. Subtract the open cells from 100 and this is your brood viability. Usually 85% and higher is acceptable, but you may want to select your own criteria.

waxmouth11Fifth, check for diseases and pests. Strong colonies control pests and diseases much better than smaller, weak colonies. For example, a strong colony will not allow wax moths to destroy the hive. They will kill moths and carry out wax moth larvae. Strong colonies are much better at controlling small hive beetles and other pests and diseases.

When Small Hive Beetle (SHB) and wax moths are present, the colony is usually very weak. Diseases can also spread in a weak colony because fewer bees in a colony means fewer bees that could be controlling the disease.


WHAT IF I TRULY HAVE A WEAK HIVE?
Usually there are two options available when faced with a weak hive. First, it can be combined with a stronger colony using the newspaper method. This is demonstrated in our online class, "A Day In The Apiary With David." Be sure there are no pests or diseases in the weak hive before you combine it with a strong colony. Otherwise, you might weaken the strong colony by combining. When combining hives, pull out the queen in the weak colony and lay sheets of newspaper on the top of the strong colony, just above the frames of the brood nest. Poke a few holes in it so that the bees between the two opposing colonies will gradually become familiar with each other, as they eat through the newsprint.

A second option is to strengthen the weak hive. This means that you will need to feed the weak hive. Do not use an entrance feeder as this may entice robbing. Instead use our Burns Bees Feeding System. Try to feed pollen as well. Our feeder provides an area to insert the pollen patties. If the hive is weak going into winter, be sure the queen is good and then begin to feed the bees 1:1 sugar water with 1 teaspoon of our pollen powder per quart.  Continue this feeding regiment until the hive becomes strong with more brood and more stored food. Since our feeding system comes with two feeding holes for sugar water, you can place one jar of 1:1 and one jar of 2:1. 1:1 stimulates brood production and 2:1 will allow the bees to store it for winter.

TIP OF THE DAY: Do not leave a queen excluder in an overwintering hive. The colony may move above the queen excluder and leave the queen to freeze to death below. And never leave a partially filled medium super on an overwintering hive. Only leave the super on top if it  has a minimum of 7 frames of sealed honey, otherwise the colony may move up but quickly run out of food.

wintercandyEMERGENCY FEEDING: In the event that your weak hive goes into winter, but runs out of food, we suggest you use one of our WINTER-BEE-KIND boards.

Winter-Bee-Kind For Winter Feed For Bees
In The summer of 2011 we introduced our Winter-Bee-Kind after several years of studying overwintering hives. We could barely keep up with production they were in such demand. We still make them right here at Long Lane Honey Bee Farms but we've expanded our production methods to keep up with demand. So many beekeepers tell us that these are the only thing that gets their hives through the winter.

It is a one piece candy board that provides food, ventilation, upper insulation and an upper exit/entrance to help bees remain healthier during the winter.  With the built in upper vent, you don't have to worry about snow covering up your hive's lower entrance. The bees can still go in and out through the top vent spacing. We avoid shipping Winter-Bee-Kinds in hot weather and start shipping each November-March. You can place our Winter-Bee-Kinds on your hive anytime, even in the winter. Because it goes on top of the hive in place of the inner cover, and you are NOT removing any frames, it can be placed on the hive in cold weather. Just do it fast. Open the top, remove the inner cover and place the candy side down and the vent slot toward the front of the hive and you're done. Click here to order your Winter-Bee-Kinds




Commonly Asked Questions
Q: Which way does the candy face in the hive?
A: The candy faces down just above the winter cluster. Normally, this means that the Winter-Bee-Kind would be placed on the brood box that contains the cluster. For example, if you overwinter your bees in a single deep hive body, the Winter-Bee-Kind would be placed on this deep hive body with the candy facing down toward the cluster. If you are using two deep hive bodies to overwinter, then the Winter-Bee-Kind would be placed on the top deep hive body. It is best to disregard the use of an inner cover, and simply place your top cover over the Winter-Bee-Kind.

Q: What about winter moisture?
A: Moisture can develop in the winter from condensation, a contrast of the heat the bees produce in the hive and the extreme cold temperature outside the hive. Condensation accumulates on the warm side, which means moistures collects on the inner cover or top cover above the hive. This can drip down on the bees and chill them during the winter. A Winter-Bee-Kind takes the place of an inner cover and any moisture that develops from condensation aids the bees in consuming the candy.

Q: How long will a Winter-Bee-Kind last on a hive?
A: On average about 3 weeks. However, a colony that has ample stored honey may not consume the candy board as fast or not at all until they need it. A colony close to starvation may consume a Winter-Bee-Kind within a week or two.

Q: Since Winter-Bee-Kinds are placed or replaced on the hive in the winter, can I open the hive up on a cold day?
A: It is best to place the candy boards on a hive when the temperature is above freezing and try to place the candy board on and have the hive sealed back up within 1-2 minutes. It should not take over 1 minute. Do not remove any frames in cold temperatures, only place your Winter-Bee-Kind on and off quickly. If you can choose the warmest day during the winter, that would be best. Try to avoid very cold, windy or rainy days.

Q: How do I refill a candy board?
A: It is best to send back your candy board and we will refill it for $7 plus shipping. If you are a good candy maker, you can do it yourself.

Q: How do I get one with a pollen?
A: Our Winter-Bee-Kinds contain pollen as well.

Q: Can I make my own?
A: You can, but you must experiment, because you do not want the candy to be too hard or too runny. The exact mix depends on your altitude, heat source and other conditions so it will be different from one location to another.

Q: Why was some liquid sugar dripping out of my Winter-Bee-Kind when I received it?
A: It is the nature of candy boards to be a bit on the dripping side even though the top may be hard. Do not be concerned if you see liquid sugar dripping out of your boards when you receive it. It usually means it was left on end during shipment for a prolong period of time. The bees will clean everything up and enjoy this soft liquid.

Q: How much sugar is in one Winter-Bee-Kind?
A: Approximately 5 pounds

Q: When do I put a Winter-Bee-Kind on my hive?
A: Any time! Nov, Dec, Jan, Feb are good months to place on the boards.

Q How often should I check my Winter-Bee-Kind?
A: Every two weeks, take a peek.

Q: Do you make Winter-Bee-Kind for 5 frame nucs or 8 frame hives?
A: Yes, check out our website to order, but carefully read the description to make sure you are ordering the correct size and type.

Q: Can the candy break loose from the board on the hive?
A: It rarely happens, but during extreme winter weather, the candy and separate from the board while on the hive. This is not a problem. The bees will continue to consume the sugar.

Q: When I place it on the hive, do I use my inner cover. Just how does it go on?
A: Winter-Bee-Kind takes the place of your inner cover. Simply place the Winter-Bee-Kind on the top of your upper hive body or super with the candy facing down, then place your top cover on top of the Winter-Bee-Kind. Be sure to use a rock or brick to make sure the wind does not blow your top cover off.

Thanks for joining us for another lesson in beekeeping. We’d love to hear from you and hopefully peak your interest in beekeeping. Feel free to contact us at:
Long Lane Honey Bee Farms
14556 N 1020 E. Rd
Fairmount, IL 61841
217.427.2678

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Good Friends

When we first started our beekeeping business there was a lot to learn. We learned much of it the hard way. Mistakes were made but we always got back up on our feet and kept going. 

Years ago we use to ship packages through the Post Office. I remember the very first time we shipped packages it was a nightmare. An awesome fellow helped us out and showed us the ropes. My daughter Karee and I worked from 4pm until 10am, all through the night getting those packages ready to be shipped. 

All along the way we have met great people. I refuse to start naming people because I'll leave someone out. Beekeeping is a great hobby because you meet so many great people.  Our customers are great!  We have made so many friends through our business. 


Last week a couple stopped by to see us from New Hampshire. He has been following our videos and podcast for years! A great customer and Sheri and I teased him and called him our one and only fan. Bill and Trisha Whisman. We had such a great time visiting with them. When they got ready to leave, I felt like I wanted to give them something, so I gave them a jar of honey, my prototype of my Frame Prop, and my stainless steel hive tool that I have used for years. Bill acted like I gave him a million dollars. 

It is great to interact and enjoy customers. Quite frankly, it's what keeps us going. Knowing that people enjoy our classes and the products we make gives us a boost.

That's why I love teaching beekeeping classes so much. I enjoy the energy of knowing I am helping others understand more about a hobby they love so much. This Saturday I'm teaching my first "Getting Your Bees Through The Winter"class for this year. I'm really looking forward to it. I'd love to see another 5 or 6 sign up. We still have room. Click here to join me. Class starts this Saturday at 1 in the afternoon and runs until 6pm. When class is over, there's a nice steak house called, Possum Trot Supper Club about 5 miles away. As a class special, those attending the winter class this Saturday can purchase and take home winter-bee-kinds. We will have around 30-40 available.


I've made friends with many customers because they bring back so many Winter-Bee-Kinds for us to refill. The winter-bee-kind feeder is such a life saver for bees in the winter. Give one a try.
Click here to order a winter-bee-kind now.

Probably the greatest friendship maker so far is BeeTeam6! I started a program to help coach and mentor beekeepers. Now I feel like I'm friends with 200 people from around the country. They text me or call me or email me their questions. They will send me a picture or video of something strange going on in their hive. Because we value their friendship so much Sheri and I started a podcast exclusively for Beeteam6 members. I thought I'd post a link here so you can listen to our first one and maybe decide you'd like to join this growing group of beekeepers that I personally mentor. Take a listen and then click here to join BeeTeam6

I was talking to a customer/friend last week and he told me that he hated that he missed one of our online beekeeping classes. I asked him what he meant and he explained that he missed the cut off date. I was happy to tell him that there is no cut off date. That's the beauty of these online classes, you can take them any time! Why not even take them this winter to get ready for next season. Or take the Winter Class now to prepare your colony for winter. So remember you can take these online classes anytime from the comfort of your home. 

Our Online Beekeeping Classes From The Comfort Of Your Home

Understanding Bees of Winter Physiology 

In my winter class this coming Saturday I will demonstrate to the class how to feed your bees for maximum build up of bees with winter physiology. So many bees die in the fall because summer bees only live 45 days. Bees of winter physiology live 4-6 months. So the more bees you raise in October the more bees will keep your hive warm this winter and be ready to make splits in the spring. But there is an art and science to doing this correctly.  There are still several open spots in this class for Saturday or you can take the online Winter class now. Click here for the online winter class.
Use our Burns Bees Feeding System now to prepare your bees for winter! Watch below.


Beekeeper's Best Friend In The Winter
This will make you a Winter Beekeeping Boss!  If you've never heard of our Winter-Bee-Kind, it was invented and created by certified master beekeeper, David Burns. He created a way to provide winter ventilation, upper insulation (to control condensation) and winter food for bees. David has a proprietary mix that meets the winter nutritional needs of bees.

For many years beekeepers have relied on the WBKs to get their bees through the winter. Obtaining a Winter-Bee-Kind requires planning!
We will not start shipping until cooler weather, in November due to the food content. This means that those who place their orders first will be the first to be shipped in November. YOU MUST QUEUE UP NOW!

For those placing their orders now, you'll be the first to receive your WBK sometime in November. 


Join Certified Master Beekeeper David Burns in the bee yard. Spend some time walking around the bee yard with David, looking through hives, trying different things and even hiving a swarm. This online class has lots of things to see right inside the hive. Sign up now as this is an online course you can watch anytime, from the comfort of your home. Click Here For More Info  It's David's Newest Course.




David's eBook Available On Amazon
"Getting Your Bees Through The WInter"

Thanks for being a friend!
David & Sheri


Sunday, August 5, 2018

Should You Feed Your Bees in Late Summer or Fall?

A few days ago Sheri and I celebrated 38 years of marriage.  We have six children and eleven grandchildren. Those of you who are our age know that time flies by so fast, especially the older you get. When you are young, you struggle to raise you family and pay your bills. When you get older you struggle with aging parents, health concerns and you worry about your children and grandchildren. It's the cycle of life that has been going on since the beginning of time.

On your tombstone they will put your birth year and the year you died with a dash between those dates. The dash makes up everything you did in life. How does this tie into beekeeping you ask? Beekeeping is part of the dash, a hobby or a business, a way of getting our minds off of our troubles. It helps us enjoy being outdoors, enjoying nature and helps us appreciate the world we live in and the life we have.

Beekeeping gives us a distraction, a focus, an interest and a way to be busy with our hands and minds. Sometimes we feel that our bees need us...to feed them, to control their mites or to help them make it through winter. But we need them too, not just to pollinate and make us honey, but they become part of our family, like a pet. I've read that having a pet can have health benefits by reducing stress. 

When I married Sheri in 1980 I never thought we'd be beekeepers or own a bee business. But here we are. Even though we both have college degrees and have had different careers, for over a decade we've enjoyed the life that the bees have given us or I should say our beekeeping customers have given us. 

To be honest, we look at the orders everyday because it's our bread and butter. Sheri and I do not have other jobs.  No orders, no bread and butter. We look at every hive that is built and shipped out. Sheri sometimes touches up a blemish with a paint brush. Trisha staples cardboard corners on the hive boxes to prevent them from being damaged in shipping. Every queen I raise I'm proud to send her to a customer because I love her brood pattern and her daughter's gentle disposition. Every winter-bee-kind board I personally pour, I mix it just right to help your bees survive a brutal winter. I labor over editing every online class to get it perfect. I invented the Burns Feeding System for fall feeding not to make a buck, but to help you and to help bees survive, to solve a problem of bees starving in the fall from protein deprivation.  Everything we do is not about making a buck, but helping to solve a beekeeping problem. And when you place an order, you are helping us. That's the dash, that's life. As we help you, you help our family and we really appreciate that. You've helped us have a wonderful 38 years of marriage. This may sound too philosophical but beekeeping is art, science and a labor of love. 

The best beekeepers eventually develop a three prong approach to beekeeping: Science, Art and A Love for Bees. To raise bees merely by science is unsuccessful. To raise them only as an art, is failure. To raise them only because you love them, but know nothing about the art or science ends in disaster. But the three together makes a successful beekeeper. Within the art, is the developed skill and the science. Love motivates us to do our best for our bees. In my lessons, classes, emails and videos I try to convey the art, science and love of beekeeping.

So when you are considering placing an order with us, know in advance that we really appreciate it so much. It's rewarding to know that you see and appreciate our hard work and personal touch we give everything we do. Thank you. 

Here's what we are most proud of:



Our Online Beekeeping Classes From The Comfort Of Your Home


David's Mentorship/Coaching Program - Email, Text or Phone David

Should You Feed Your Bees in Late Summer or Fall?

Beekeeping is stuck in an old paradigm in many areas. One of these areas is in fall feeding. The old paradigm says to feed 2:1 sugar water in the fall to help the bees build up their stores for winter. While this isn't wrong, there is a more effective approach. 2:1 means two parts sugar and one part water making the syrup thicker so that bees can dry it into "honey" faster and store it into the comb. However, what's missing in this approach is how to build up your fall population of bees of winter physiology. Summer bees live 45 days. This means a bee that you see going in and out of your hive in September and October will be dead in 45 days. However, bees raised in October and November will live 4-6 months and the more bees you have of winter physiology, the more heat your colony can produce in the winter allowing the cluster to move into honey stores more easily. However, colonies rarely build up fall brood on 2:1 sugar water. They need 1:1 sugar water with a teaspoon of protein powder, such as pollen powder. This stimulates the colony to build up more brood as during a nectar flow in the spring. Do not use an entrance feeder as this will cause robbing. Instead, feed from the top. Start this feeding in late summer (or a dearth) and continue through fall until the temperature drops below 50 degrees (f). 
New studies show that nurse bees which are protein deprived will not be able to adequately feed developing larvae. Those larvae will develop into adult bees with many issues such as shortened lives. Bees need more than 2:1 in the fall. They need 1:1 with protein to help them build up healthy bees of winter physiology
Use our Burns Bees Feeding System now to prepare your bees for winter!

Stop Smashing Your Bees!

Beekeepers Around The Country Rave Over Our Winter-Bee-Kinds
Our Winter-Bee-Kinds are available for purchase. If you've never heard of our Winter-Bee-Kind, it was invented and created by certified master beekeeper, David Burns. He created a way to provide winter ventilation, upper insulation (to control condensation) and winter food for bees. David has a proprietary mix that meets the winter nutritional needs of bees.

For many years beekeepers have relied on the WBKs to get their bees through the winter. Obtaining a Winter-Bee-Kind requires planning!
We will not start shipping until cooler weather, in November due to the food content. This means that those who place their orders first will be the first to be shipped in November. YOU MUST QUEUE UP NOW!

For those placing their orders now, you'll be the first to receive your WBK sometime in November. 



BeeTeam6 is about to get even better. David and Sheri will now be including a beekeeping podcast several times a month.

Now it's time to stop making silly mistakes that caused your colony to become queenless, weak or fail entirely. Beekeeping seems easy. The fellow down the road has some hives and he made it sound easy. The books made it sound simple. Different YouTubers made it sound uncomplicated. Yikes! They were wrong. It's not as easy as it looks. You need a mentor. 

Testimonial: "As a new beekeeper, the amount of information available is overwhelming, and often maddeningly contradictory.  Also, the situation in MY hives never seems to quite match what the books and websites cover.  I longed to be an apprentice to learn from a master, or to have that person come look at my bees and tell me what's going on.  But that simply wasn't available to me...until I became a member of David's Bee Team 6!  Now I have a certified master beekeeper a phone call, text, or email away.  I can send photos so that it's like he's looking over my shoulder into my hive with me.  From persistent chalkbrood, to supersedure cells, to marking the queen...David has been there as my guide.  He's calm and cheerful and understanding even in the face of a tearful phone call from a distraught new beek.  Also as a Bee Team 6 member, I get newsletters and videos with timely info-all of it goes into my three-ring binder, and I refer back to it all the time.  I also took his online courses-and I can tell you that they are invaluable!  In a world where normal apprenticing isn't practical, David's Bee Team 6 is the answer!"
 
Rhonda Morton
Corning, NY

Certified Master Beekeeper David Burns saw a problem and came up with a solution. The problem: New beekeepers making mistakes and failing to properly manage bee hives resulting in high losses. The solution: David's mentorship/coaching approach that allows beekeepers to view important videos and read articles pertaining to seasonal issues. And the opportunity to call or email David's personal cell phone when you need advice from a certified master beekeeper.


I'm glad you are keeping bees or thinking about it. Thank you for supporting our family business for all your beekeeping needs.

Sincerely,

David and Sheri Burns
Long Lane Honey Bee Farms
217-427-2678

New 2018 Store Location Hours:
Monday- Closed
Tuesday 10am - 2pm
Wednesday 10am - 2pm
Thursday 10am - 2pm
Friday 10am - 2pm
Saturday - 10am -2pm

Come visit us soon!

Sunday, July 29, 2018

August-October Determines Your Colony's Winter Survival

Happy Summer!  We are David and Sheri Burns from Long Lane Honey Bee 
Farms and honeybeesonline.com. Slow down summer! We all stay so busy enjoying all the summertime activities that before we know it, summer is gone.

We are excited about our "Getting Your Bees Through The Winter" course available as an online course. You can now take it from the comfort of your home. You must start preparing your hives for winter in August. We worked hard on making this course everything you need to know to prepare for winter!
Sign up now.

***NEW ONLINE COURSE*** 
Also we are excited about one of David's most popular courses now available online. 
A DAY IN THE APIARY WITH DAVID
David recorded his Day in the apiary course and now you can enjoy this course online. It is RAW, UNEDITED footage. Watch the video below for some snapshots of this course...

New Online Course: A DAY IN THE APIARY

We are now taking Pre-Orders For A DAY IN THE APIARY WITH DAVID. Sign up now.

David's Newest Invention
Over the years David has struggled with a way to inspect colonies without having to lay a frame down smashing bees. Over the last decade you've probably noticed David laying a frame down on its side to capture a queen. For months he worked to create a new product to work frames without smashing and killing bees. He did it!

ONLY 3 DAYS UNTIL OUR WINTER-BEE-KINDS GO LIVE
Beekeepers Around The Country Rave Over Our Winter-Bee-Kinds
In just 3 days, on August 1st, our Winter-Bee-Kinds will be available for purchase. If you've never heard of our Winter-Bee-Kind, it was invented and created by certified master beekeeper, David Burns. He created a way to provide winter ventilation, upper insulation (to control condensation) and winter food for bees. David has a proprietary mix that meets the winter nutritional needs of bees.

For many years beekeepers have relied on the WBKs to get their bees through the winter. Obtaining a Winter-Bee-Kind requires planning!
Even though they go on sale August 1st, they cannot be shipped until cooler weather, in November due to the food content. This means that those who place their orders first will be the first to be shipped in November. YOU MUST QUEUE UP NOW!

For those placing their orders on August 1st, you'll be the first to receive your WBK sometime in November. So be ready to place your order in three days! If you try and order prior to August 1st, it says, "SOLD OUT." But you will be able to follow this link and order on or after August 1st. 


You've Made Some Mistakes This Year. Why Repeat These Same Mistakes Next Year?

Beekeeping Class
Now it's time to stop making silly mistakes that caused your colony to become queenless, weak or fail entirely. Beekeeping seems easy. The fellow down the road has some hives and he made it sound easy. The books made it sound simple. Different YouTubers made it sound uncomplicated. Yikes! They were wrong. It's not as easy as it looks. You need a mentor. 

Testimonial: "As a new beekeeper, the amount of information available is overwhelming, and often maddeningly contradictory.  Also, the situation in MY hives never seems to quite match what the books and websites cover.  I longed to be an apprentice to learn from a master, or to have that person come look at my bees and tell me what's going on.  But that simply wasn't available to me...until I became a member of David's Bee Team 6!  Now I have a certified master beekeeper a phone call, text, or email away.  I can send photos so that it's like he's looking over my shoulder into my hive with me.  From persistent chalkbrood, to supersedure cells, to marking the queen...David has been there as my guide.  He's calm and cheerful and understanding even in the face of a tearful phone call from a distraught new beek.  Also as a Bee Team 6 member, I get newsletters and videos with timely info-all of it goes into my three-ring binder, and I refer back to it all the time.  I also took his online courses-and I can tell you that they are invaluable!  In a world where normal apprenticing isn't practical, David's Bee Team 6 is the answer!"
 
Rhonda Morton
Corning, NY

Certified Master Beekeeper David Burns saw a problem and came up with a solution. The problem: New beekeepers making mistakes and failing to properly manage bee hives resulting in high losses. The solution: David's mentorship/coaching approach that allows beekeepers to view important videos and read articles pertaining to seasonal issues. And the opportunity to call or email David's personal cell phone when you need advice from a certified master beekeeper.



We are glad you are keeping bees or thinking about it. Thank you for supporting our family business for all your beekeeping needs.

We know you can look around and maybe even save a buck. Thank you for supporting a small, American, family business. Our hives are still built right here in Illinois. We raise all our queens here in Illinois. We appreciate your business.

Sincerely,

David and Sheri Burns
Long Lane Honey Bee Farms
217-427-2678

New 2018 Store Location Hours:
Monday- Closed
Tuesday 10am - 2pm
Wednesday 10am - 2pm
Thursday 10am - 2pm
Friday 10am - 2pm
Saturday - 10am -2pm

Come visit us soon!